GWEN STEFANI FOR JANUARY VOGUE…

Can we please just take a moment. Take a moment of sheer admiration, envy and lust over these photos. Well, more than a mere moment is needed but I’ll carry on for the sake of finishing this blog post before my dinner is ready.

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Ms Wintour has placed the ever-stunning and graciously cool Gwen Stefani on the cover of Vogue for the January 2013 issue, and doesn’t she look FAB?! (In my humble opinion it looks more like a December cover than a refreshing January issue, but who am I to disagree with the high priestess of fashion?) Gwen is of course wearing Saint Laurent Paris by Hedi Slimane, the designer’s first collection for the newly overhauled classic French label, and it has to be said that they look like they were made for Ms Stefani herself. Looking (as always) effortlessly cool with a dollop of chic, Stefani just epitomises the kind of woman everyone wants to be, well the woman I want to be anyway.
With all the photos shot by Annie Leibovitz you know already that the shoot is going to be special. Leibovitz also shot Stefani’s previous cover for Vogue in 2004.

The January 2013 issue of American Vogue is out on US newsstands now, with it being released here in the UK within the next couple of weeks, and you can bet your bottom dollar that I’ll be inspecting every shelf in every WHSmiths that I can get to until I have this beauty in my paws.

ON A DESERT ISLAND, THE PIGEON POST WILL ONLY BRING ONE PUBLICATION EACH MONTH. WHICH ONE WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

This piece was the required written article that I submitted as part of my Fashion Journalism portfolio for UCA.

I live in a small town in Cambridgeshire. A slightly nondescript place where cultural diversity is perhaps not as common as, say, a city centre would be. Everyone here fits into a nice little mould. Everyone going about their business, speculating what others are doing, all the while trying (and failing) to move with the times. This, for me, is a parallel predicament to publications such as Vogue or Elle. For myself personally, they do not spark any inspiration. They do not get me excited. They depress me, make me feel inadequate, poor and fat.

My publication of choice would be V Magazine. (Technically it is a quarterly magazine, but I’m hoping that still counts…). The first thing that strikes the reader upon seeing V for the first time is possibly its size. Or the extraordinarily bold cover. Or the fabulously overpowering logo. It could possibly be many aspects of V’s cover format that attracts the reader at first glance. For me personally, it was the size. Being A3, it’s larger than most other “commercial” fashion magazines, I found this to be special. Almost like the magazine was so tremendous that it was worth that extra paper.

The content of the magazine itself is undeniably captivating and full of passion. From the powerful imagery on each page, to the small font that carries an even more powerful stance on the topic in which it’s portraying, V is by far oozing the most contemporary and innovative pieces and photographs. One of my favourite aspects of the V is that each issue, the magazine is heavily themed. The theme is an occurring motif on every single item featured in the magazine.

Last summer saw Lady Gaga become a columnist for V, which for me as a huge Gaga fan, couldn’t be more exciting. If the magazine couldn’t get even more fresh and exciting already, for me it just did. I cannot comprehend how much I adore V for collaborating with a contemporary artist such as Lady Gaga on an ongoing project for the sake of art and fashion, rather than just a celebrity-endorsed empty program.

V magazine, being an American publication, is not particularly easy to find in the area that I live, so when I do find it, I cherish it, reading each issue over and over again to devour every word written and every photograph shot. Having a new issue every three months is thrilling for me and living in such a drab and non-diversified community makes reading V all the more enthralling.